After-school naps beneficial for some

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By Regina Dispa

Resting after a long day at school, sophomore Paula Dispa takes a short afternoon nap to regain some energy. Photo by Regina Dispa
Resting after a long day at school, sophomore Paula Dispa takes a short afternoon nap to regain some energy. Photo by Regina Dispa

We all know those people who just cannot keep their eyes open in class no matter how how many times the teacher yells at them. For those sleepy heads, an afternoon nap might make the difference.

According to the Mayo Clinic, taking time in the afternoon for a 30-minute nap can improve memory function and lower one’s blood pressure.

“I really love naps after a long day because it helps me gain more energy for the day especially if I have late practice,” Harrison Skinner, junior, said.

Afternoon napping offers various benefits including relaxation, reduced fatigue, increased alertness, improved mood, and better performance, including quicker reaction time.

“After a nap I usually feel groggy and disoriented, and it also gives me insomnia so I try to avoid after school naps,” Travis Smith, sophomore, said.

For those who suffer from insomnia, naps could be a serious problem, even if they feel tired during the day. It can increase bad sleeping habits for people with temporary sleep issues caused by stress, illness, or jet lag.

Napping can cause sleep inertia, which is the feeling of grogginess that most people experience after waking up from a nap, and can also cause sleep problems. Short naps don’t affect night time sleep for most people, but if a person experiences insomnia or has poor sleeping habits at night, napping may enhance these problems.

“After school naps are bittersweet; the sleep is nice, but then you stay up ‘til 2 a.m. because you don’t feel tired at all,” Dalton Kincaid, sophomore, said.