School crimes climb

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By Karissa Erven

Officer Rooks demonstrates the proper way to hold the hands of an offender to Aleyia Davis, senior. Rooks monitors campus before, after and during school to ensure student safety. (Photo by Karissa Erven)
Officer Rooks demonstrates the proper way to hold the hands of an offender to Aleyia Davis, senior. Rooks monitors campus before, after and during school to ensure student safety. (Photo by Karissa Erven)

This school year, 29 reports of school crimes have been noted so far. That number doesn’t include the thefts students inform the officers of daily.

Jamie Phillips, junior, has dealt with theft. At lunch, Phillips and a friend went to get food, forgetting that he left his wallet with $10 in it on the table. When he returned, it was gone. Later that day, Phillips found his wallet in the sink and half of his money missing.

“I feel betrayed when I’m stolen from. Why would anyone want to do that? Especially if it is someone close to you,” Phillips said.

In 2012, students between the ages of 12 and 18 experienced more than 1.3 million non-fatal victimizations, as stated by usnews.com.

According to Officer Rooks, a Clark County School District police officer assigned to Coronado, the crime rate for Coronado has risen noticeably from last year.

The most common crime at school is theft; drug use is second. Some fights at school are caused because of these two crimes.

“I didn’t have a fight until December last year.” Boorks said.  “Already, there have been at least seven. That is as many as there were total last year.”

The worst crimes are not thefts or fights, but felonies. The only time someone would be sent to jail for a fight is if the other person has not agreed to it or they do not stop when the officer shows up. Arrests are saved for more serious crimes.

“I usually try to wait when no one is around to do an arrest. If they’re in my office, I’ll wait for the bell to ring and take them out the back,” Rooks said.

The officers and students who are affected by these crimes do not understand why they are so common.

“Maybe because the people are greedy and want things, but they can’t have it, or people don’t take care of their things and don’t lock them up. I always have my phone on me, but I do take things to school that I’m worried about losing, like my wallet,” Phillips said.