No-Shave takes over November

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By Sara Seibel

Sporting his five o’clock shadow, Jesse Wilson, junior, watches the rain fall from outside the 800’s hallway . He plans to participate fully in No-Shave November. Photo by Faith Evans
Sporting his five o’clock shadow, Jesse Wilson, junior, watches the rain fall from outside the 800’s hallway . He plans to participate fully in No-Shave November. Photo by Faith Evans

Athletes can do it. Politicians can do it. Baristas can do it. Moms can do it. Students can do it. Really, almost anybody can do it: Put down their razors for a month and participate in No-Shave November.

No-Shave, originally meant only for guys, now has girls taking part in the event. According to the organization’s website, “It’s a month-long journey during which participants forgo shaving and grooming in order to evoke conversation and raise cancer awareness.”

This yearly tradition can be traced back to Australia in 2004. A group of 30 men grew out their shaggy beards for a month to raise awareness for cancer patients and depression in men. The movement continued to gain momentum, and in 2009 the Hill family, who had recently lost their father to cancer, created the non-profit organization. Since then, No-Shave has continued to grow, raising over $2 million for cancer awareness.

“I know a little bit about the background, but I mostly do it because it’s fun,” Jackson Gregory, junior, said.

No Shave November and “Movember,” a movement in which only moustaches are grown out, supports many charities worldwide and encourages everyone to get involved. It aims to increase early cancer detection, effective treatments, and reduce preventable deaths. It also encourages others to adopt a healthier lifestyle.

“I really believe in the cause it supports and hope others like me take part in it this year,” said Nathaniel Hawkes, sophomore.

Around the world people are diving in and rallying around to support a great cause. Today, more than 50,000 people participate in the month long awareness celebration.

The rules are to put away razors and refrain from waxing throughout the whole month of November. In addition to letting their hair grow and embracing the hair that many cancer patients lose, participants can choose to take the funds typically spent on grooming and donate them to the non-profit organization No-Shave November @https://no-shave.org/donate/general

According to The Daily Collegian (Nov. 15, 2012), the challenge for most guys is the discomfort a beard or mustache may cause during the first few weeks. They usually become itchy and patchy, but if they ignore those scruffy situations, then they successfully complete the challenge and help support the movement.

Anyone can do it, and even teachers are getting in on the “no shave” action.

“I’m all for cancer awareness, so I am not shaving this month or next month for AIDS awareness,” said Mr. Snead, English teacher.