Becoming court ready is challenging

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By Kacie Leach

During second lunch on Monday, Oct. 26, homecoming queen nominee Kacie Leach, 12,  laughs along with her friend Reilly Scott, 12, after describing how challenging it was to match her sash to her outfit. (Photo by Chelsey Mayo
During second lunch on Monday, Oct. 26, homecoming queen nominee Kacie Leach, 12, laughs along with her friend Reilly Scott, 12, after describing how challenging it was to match her sash to her outfit. (Photo by Chelsey Mayo

Homecoming season is upon us, and there are so many gosh darn things to do before the big day. No one is ready for this, no one I tell you.

The most important thing any girl needs on the big day is a dress. Omg, a dress… more like stress. Trying on 57 dresses in Forever 21 and Urban Outfitters combined while putting 22 of them on hold because you can’t decide which is best. Being forced to try on hideous dresses in Macy’s department store because mom has a Macy’s credit card. A dress is crucial and can make or break the night. I need to feel classy yet scandalous, stunning yet comfortable. I need to turn heads. I need to turn heads so hard that the morning after everyone has a sore neck.

The dress might make the night, but the shoes make the dress; it’s as simple as that. Yet it’s more complicated than “What shoes do I wear?” Do I wear heels, Chelsea boots, or flats? What about blinged-out Chucks? For the past three years every homecoming queen has worn bedazzled tennis shoes, therefore I must wear bedazzled shoes if I have any chance of winning this title.

Not to mention finding the perfect guy. Every homecoming queen needs a date. Is it better to be matched with another guy on court or to choose a guy for myself? If I’m paired with someone, there’s the chance that they don’t appreciate my bedazzled shoes and my egg shell-not cream-colored dress. Cream colored looks horrible with my hazel eyes. Egg shell, on the other hand, makes me look like an angel, according to my nana.

I don’t wake up “Hoco ready.” This look takes time. I need at least three hours and two of my closest friends to help me with my makeup. I can’t look too provocative, but I don’t want to look too conservative. I’m hoping for a happy medium: Serena Vanderwoodsen at a Chuck Bass party is exactly what I’m striving for.

Do I wear my hair up or down? If it’s up, I need to buy the right earrings to accommodate my dress, and, of course, they need to be the same color “bling” as my shoes. But if I wear my hair down, should it be curled or straight? I can’t look like a poodle with overly curly hair on homecoming; there’s going to be pictures of me in the yearbook. There is no way I can reminisce on these memories and look like Shirley Temple.

Overall, being on homecoming court is a lot of work. Not only do I have to participate in every spirit day, but I also have to plan my outfits to match my homecoming sash.

If you ever run into someone who is on homecoming court, give him or her a hand hug, not an actual hug. My dress is finally wrinkle free, my hair could burst from the thousands of bobby pins at any moment, and court members have to look flawless.